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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 10:48 am 
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If you create a new VDS with an SSD attached to it, or reinstall an old one, the SSD will automatically be created and mounted for you, using a file system appropriate to your OS selection.

* On Windows, it will be made NTFS, and should automatically be detected when you boot up. You may have to click through on a "New hardware" selection box when you first log in, that will call it a "Xen Block Device" or similar -- proceed with that install. Windows may also warn you that the driver is unsigned; tell it to continue. After the driver is installed, the SSD space will become your "F:".

* On Linux, it will be made ext3 or ext4, and show up automatically at the "/ssd" mount point.

If you add an SSD to an existing package, it will be created and formatted for you, but you may have to perform additional steps.

* On Windows, it should automatically be detected when you boot up, and you may have to click through on a "New hardware" selection box that will call it a "Xen Block Device" or similar -- go ahead and let it. Windows may also ask you if you are sure about the driver, which is unsigned; let it proceed here, as well. After the driver is installed, the SSD will become your "F:".

* On Linux, you will need to mount the drive and tell the OS to auto-mount it for you after each boot. Use the following commands in your SSH window while logged in as root:

Code:
mkdir /ssd
mount /dev/sdb1 /ssd

If the "mount" line shows an error, you may need to use "/dev/xvdb1" or "/dev/xvde1" instead -- different kernel versions and distributions use different designations.

Then, enter a command including the same device name in order to auto-mount it at boot. Adjust this line to match what you used instead of "/dev/sdb1" in your last command:

Code:
echo "/dev/sdb1 /ssd ext4 noatime 0 1" >> /etc/fstab

If you are running CentOS, use "ext3" in the last line, instead of "ext4", as CentOS does not support ext4. It could also show as "/dev/hdb1" on old versions of CentOS.


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